Category Archives: Meditation

Yi Fa Qi Gong

Yi Fa Qi Gong with Swami Anand Nisarg

Yi Fa Qi Gong Workshop Video Pics!

Qi Gong Exercises description

Yi Fa Qi Gong Videos:

Warm up Exercises

Preliminary Exercises 1 , Preliminary Exercises 2

level 1 Earth exercise

Qi Gong Exercises description  (word document for Level 1 Earth Exercise)

Qi Gong is not only a series of gentle movement exercises for physical health, or work with different focus points/energy-centers of the body; it is also an advanced system of meditation designed to elevate your consciousness and help you to, over time, manifest your higher self (called “The Superior Individual”).

Yi Fa Qi gong is a series of exercises and practices, based on the elemental system found in the I Ching, the most ancient of Chinese spiritual texts. In spite of being one of the most advanced and complete systems of Qi Gong, the basic exercises of Yi Fa are very simple and easy to learn. The exercises do not take very long to do and are ideal for the modern world as you can adjust the time spent on the exercises according to your daily schedule.

Swami Anand Nisarg is the author of The Magician’s I Ching, published by Karnac/Aeon books. Alternatively, the book can be purchased through amazon: Magicians- I Ching-Swami-Anand-Nisarg at Amazon.com
Swami Anand Nisarg’s book, The Magician’s I Ching, is an attempt to present the I Ching not for the academic, but for the practical western user that wants to actually work with the ‘alchemy’ of the I Ching.

He has been a student of the I Ching for over 20 years, of Qi Gong for over 15 years, and of both the western and eastern esoteric/magical tradition. He is a spiritual teacher with students and initiates worldwide, and the modern head of the YI FA Society, a school for training in a meditation system of inner alchemy based on the I Ching and Qi Gong.

For further information please contact Swami Anand Nisarg: swamiji_nisarg@yahoo.com

I CHING

Swami Anand Nisarg is the author of The Magician’s I Ching, published by Karnac/Aeon books.

He has been a student of the I Ching for over 20 years, and of both the western and eastern esoteric/magical tradition. He is a spiritual teacher with students and initiates worldwide, and the modern head of the YI FA Society, a school for training in a meditation system of inner alchemy based on the I Ching and Qi Gong.

The I Ching is “the book of changes”; as a text it is the oldest spiritual book in Chinese history, and one of the Five Classics (the five books that Chinese culture considers the ‘foundational’ books of their entire civilization; it’s the only one of the five that is about spirituality).

The core section of the I Ching (called the Zhou Yi) dates to about three thousand years ago, and was compiled by King Wen and his son the Duke of Zhou, but it is clear that they were only organizing in written form a system that was already old by their time.  For its entire history it has been venerated by Chinese culture, and is the only sacred text that is considered sacred to all three of the major Chinese religions (Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism).  For the last 3000 years virtually every great Chinese philosopher has studied the I Ching and most presented new insights and commentaries on it, many of which survive to this day.

The I Ching is a book of philosophy and of metaphysics but is also a practical ‘oracle’ system, where a practitioner can ask a question and then use a method based on binary mathematics to generate one of the 64 ‘hexagrams’ of the I Ching; this ‘casting’ system acts as a kind of measurement of space/time in the context of the question, showing you the balance of yin and yang (in the form of the 8 elements) as of the moment where you ask the question, what parts of the situation are stable and which are in the process of Change, and how that change will evolve over time.

Or to put it another way, it uses probability to show you the probable direction of change to predict outcomes based on the choices you make.

Additionally, in the time of Confucius (2500 years ago) that great master wrote a set of commentaries on the I Ching which became a part of the official text, in it he explains the I Ching not just as a decision-making tool but as a system of inner-alchemy, where you can use the I Ching to understand how to manifest your higher self in any given situation.

The symbols of the I Ching became the basic symbols of all Chinese metaphysical systems: so the 8 elements of the I Ching are the foundation on which the theories of Acupuncture, Qi Gong, Feng Shui, and most native forms of Chinese martial arts are based.

The I Ching wasn’t translated into English until the second half of the 19th century, and its system was not actually practiced by any westerner we know of until the early 20th century.  It did not become popular in the west until the academic Wilhelm-Baynes translation in the 1950s, where the introduction to that edition was written by Carl Jung, who considered it of immense value to Jungian psychology.   It was also highly influential on a number of other western thinkers including writers and poets (Jorge Luis Borges, who wrote the introduction to the Spanish edition; also Ginsburg and the other beat poets, Philip K. Dick, and many others), mystics (Aleister Crowley, Robert Anton Wilson, Huxley, Timothy Leary, Terrence McKenna, Alan Watts, John Blofeld), and mathematicians and scientists (especially quantum theorists – Heisenberg, Schroedinger, and Niels Bohr who added the taiji symbol to his coat of arms).

The Magician’s I Ching may be purchased from the Karnac Books website. Alternatively, the book can be purchased through amazon:  http://www.amazon.com/Magicians-Ching-Swami-Anand-Nisarg/dp/1904658652

Swami Anand Nisarg’s book, The Magician’s I Ching, is an attempt to present the I Ching not for the academic, but for the practical western user that wants to actually work with the ‘alchemy’ of the I Ching.

The Magician’s I Ching by Swami Anand Nisarg

The Magician’s I Ching by Swami Anand NisargThe Magician’s I Ching by Swami Anand Nisarg at Karnac Books
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This article was written by Swami Anand Nisarg

 

Meditation Techniques

This article focuses on the author’s personal meditation experience. There are many forms of meditation– the key is to keep practicing.

MEDITATION

Although it can be practiced on its own, meditation is most beneficial when performed after Qigong exercises (see Qigong part 1 and or 2 articles).

BENEFITS OF MEDITATION:

Meditation relaxes the mind allowing the nervous system to relax and perform optimally throughout the body with its neural matrix. You will notice a general sense of relaxation and clarity – especially during everyday stresses – improvement of vision, blood circulation, and experience an increase of energy. Your body should feel infused with vitality.

Meditation will strengthen your mind resulting in an increased ability to focus on daily tasks that require your attention. With practice, you will eventually be in a regular state of focus or awareness of every moment, and appreciate the beauty of life and all that surrounds you.

POSITIONS:

Meditation can be started in various positions—lying down on your back, sitting or standing. Each position is useful to assist the body.

Lying supine (on the spine) is considered a healing position and requires the least amount of energy to perform. In this position, it is common to fall asleep, which is perfectly acceptable. The body heals optimally when in a sleep mode or deep rest.

Sitting meditation is commonly known from pop culture. This position is favourable and requires more energy than lying supine. Getting comfortable is necessary to maintain this position for a meditation session. If the lotus position is uncomfortable at this stage (see photo), use a pillow under the buttock as support to help prevent pain and discomfort. For those with leg or hip problems, sitting in a chair is an alternative.

Standing meditation posture is common to martial arts, known as the warrior stance. This position uses the most energy in maintaining balance with the pull of gravity. Rewarding in its own way, it is an alternative to the other two positions.

All three postures can be used to attain the desired results. Try each one to determine the benefits for you personally.

MEDITATION PRACTICE-A Personal Experience (Sitting Position):

Various teachers of meditation have influenced the author’s practice.

BEGIN, in sitting position, with one hand on top of the other hand with thumbs crossing. Place hands just below the navel over the Danteen location (energy area). Perform four counter clockwise rotations around the navel with the hands and then repeat in a clockwise direction. This is performed to stimulate energy flow from this area. Return to the starting position.

Place the tip of your tongue on the roof of your mouth with slight pressure. Purse your lips so that a fine breath of air flows out.

Begin by breathing in slowly and naturally, without force, in through the nose. The exhalation phase (breathing out) will occur passively out through the mouth. Once you feel heat in the Danteen area, imagine (as you breath in) an energy flow travelling from the base of your spine, up the spine and over your head to the top lip. At the same time feel the energy flow up from the navel to the bottom lip. As you exhale from your mouth, allow this energy to flow out. Begin a new breath in from your nose and continue the flow of energy up towards both lips. If you visualize this flow, you will eventually feel it. Do not reverse the flow down to the Danteen.

Focusing on the breath is the key to meditation for the beginner. This technique of bringing the energy to the lips helps in focusing on the breath.

Alternative techniques to help with focusing are to focus on the flame of a lit candle (in a lit room); focus on the exchange periods of your breath (the still point between breathing in and out).

It is common to drift away from focusing on the breath. Recognize it and bring yourself back to your breath focus.

End the session of meditation, when ready, by rubbing your hands together creating heat. Immediately place the hands over your face for a few moments. Repeat rubbing hands and place them over the small of your back (kidney area). Then tap your body with your hands from head to toe to reawaken your body from the stillness of meditation. Your peace and stillness will vibrate throughout your day.

OPEN EYE MEDITATION:

Open eye meditation is useful for those whom are not able to sit in stillness. Examples of this type of meditation are washing dishes, going for a walk and gardening (be creative). These are tasks that do not require as much cerebral activity. After a while of performing these tasks, the mind starts to relax and unwind, achieving a meditative state. Relaxing the mind is the goal in this practice.

Spend 1 minute to 30 minutes or more on meditation. If your time is limited, use a timer (that beeps) to keep you on track in your day. With practice come results!

Qigong meditation part 2

The following video of Qigong practice is provided by Swami, Deva Peter. This video was recorded at The Way of Harmony Meditation Group during an actual session and filmed by Georgio Trimarchi. It is with great appreciation to have permission to show this video to the public. Thank you Swami, Devi Peter.

Introduction video: Qigong mediation part 2

Full length instructional Qigong video: Qigong meditation part 2 with Swami, Deva Peter

For those that like to read the details of this Qigong sequence, please read below:

  1. Knocking on the doorway of life
  2. Spinal cord breathing
  3. The basic standing flow
  4. The breathing exercise
  5. Back to the first standing flow
  6. The fountain
  7. Second standing flow-Buddha holds the world (hands behind you)
  8. The tree swaying
  9. The third standing flow-Embracing a tree
  10. Cloudy hands-Heart exercise
  11. The fourth standing flow-Holding the golden urn (arms up in an angle in front of you)
  12. Pebble in the pond
  13. The fifth standing flow-Pulling down the heaven’s (hands facing down touching the ball of energy beneath them)
  14. Bamboo in the wind-The standing meditation

A common practice at the end of the Qigong session is to sit or lye down to meditate for a length of time that satisfies your needs.

To practice in the Toronto classes or further information, please contact Swami Deva Peter at swamidevapeter@gmail.com for a location near you. Alternatively, http://www.mystery-school.net.

We continue to follow the philosophy, of the Innergetics Company, by offering wellness clinics, health workshops, and educational and inspirational resources that build energy, awareness, and actions to help people reach their goals.

Qigong Meditation Part 1

  Wikipedia defines Qigong (Chi/Ki). This site provides the history, theory and various practices of Qigong. This site also gives information of types of applications and criticisms of Qigong. It is worth reading this article, prior to commencing, to better understand the practice of Qigong.

Georgio Trimarchi, founder of innergetics.ca, has been practicing Qigong for a few years (2009) with the Toronto group classes founded by Swami Anand Nisarg, a spiritual teacher.

Georgio has  been practicing Wing Chun Kungfu for about 7 year, initially taught by the late Sifu Jay Newberry and then by Sifu Jay’s teacher  Sifu Roy D. Anthony of Centerline Martial Arts System.

Both practices provide forms of Qigong that have benefited Georgio by balancing his energy flow, stamina, strength and further development of his health practitioner skills.

The 5 video segments of Qigong practice are provided by Swami, Anand Nisarg from his latest trip to Toronto in August 2010 and filmed by Georgio Trimarchi. It is with great appreciation to have permission to show these videos to the public. Thank you Swami, Anand Nisarg.

INSTRUCTIONS:

Throughout each video segment, dynamic or movements patterns can be repeated up to 10 times (or more).  Static posses are to be held for 1 minute or longer. Like any other exercise, adjust the repetitions of movement patterns and static posses to your own ability and comfort level. Focus on your breath, while doing this form of Qigong, in a slow and relaxed way. After completing section 5, continue to focus on breathing from 10 to 30 minutes or more in the static meditation position. For people that have trouble sitting on the floor with their legs crossed, sit on a pillow or in a chair–being comfortable is an asset to being able to achieve the desired relaxation affect in Qigong practice.

The following Qigong form is made up of 5 sections:

Qigong section 1 by Swami Anand Nasarg

Qigong section 2 by Swami Anand Nasarg

Qigong section 3 by Swami Anand Nasarg

Qigong section 4 by Swami Anand Nasarg

Qigong section 5 by Swami Anand Nasarg

Georgio Trimarchi is not an expert on this topic, he is a person that practices Qigong and has greatly benefited from this experience. He would like to invite you to share your experiences with him but for further information and guidance on Qigong, contact Swami, Anand Nisarg.

To practice in the Toronto classes, please contact Swami Deva Peter at swamidevapeter@gmail.com for a location near you.

We continue to follow the philosophy, of the Innergetics Company, by offering wellness clinics, health workshops, and educational and inspirational resources that build energy, awareness, and actions to help people reach their goals.